American Manganese; Potential Acquisition Target For Tesla Or Other Leading Battery Manufacturer

Jan. 14, 2020 9:01 AM ET

 

 

Editor's Note from Dudley Pierce Baker
I thought I would share this article with you and it is still very timely. Recycling of lithium ion batteries will be a major issue going forward in the EV arena. American Manganese, Inc, TSXV:AMY and AMYZF, seems to have a handle on the situation and is well positioned to be a major player, in my opinion. I am also a shareholder of AMY, so I encourage interested investors to perform their own due diligence. This blog post below appeared on Seeking Alpha's website.

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Summary

2 of the 4 Tier-One lithium-ion battery manufacturers have submitted samples to American Manganese for testing.

Company fits the acquisition target well because of their IP and small size.

Management has done a poor job of communicating to a wider audience.

The management team at British Columbia based American Manganese (OTCPK:OTCPK:AMYZF) [TSXV: AMY] [GR:2AMconfirms in this story that testing of the companies lithium-ion hydrometallurgical battery recycling process by two of the four Tier-One battery manufacturing companies as defined by industry leader, Benchmark Mineral Intelligence was completed in Q4 2019

The four Tier-One battery manufacturers on Benchmark’s list are as follows:

Tesla, Inc. (TSLA)

Panasonic Corporation (OTCPK:PCRFY)

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (OTC:SSNLF)

LG Chem LTD (LGCHEM)

Tesla, Panasonic and Samsung are the most likely submitters of the “tier-one NCA cathode scrap…” as detailed in the October, 25th 2019 press release from American Manganese, Inc. NCA is one of many variants of Lithium Ion batteries, this specific type contains Lithium, Nickel, Cobalt and Aluminum in the battery cathode. NCA batteries are produced by all three of those Tier-One companies. LG Chem, the only remaining Tier-One company on the list, primarily produces NMC batteries where Manganese substitutes for the Aluminum in the battery.

Sophisticated companies want IP and they want to lock up talent with employment contracts. First and foremost major companies want protected technology but they also negotiate three to five year commitments with the scientists who understand the nuances inherent to any new technology.

With less than ten employees, the company has managed to generate two U.S. patents for recycling lithium-ion batteries amongst a host of competitors who collectively hold very little Intellectual Property. Via its wholly owned U.S. subsidiary, Rocher Manganese, American Manganese holds U.S. patent No. 10,246,343 for its lithium-ion battery cathode material recycling technology. It also holds U.S. patent No.10,308,523 U.S. patent No.10,308,523 for the recycling of cathode materials into precursor cathode materials for new lithium-ion batteries.

The other thing that industrial powerhouses want nailed down are costs. To that end, American Manganese has engaged their independent research partner Kemetco Research to complete a preliminary engineering design and economic analysis study for a commercial demonstration recycling plant. Putting aside those mining terms, what can be assumed they need is a cost estimate for scaling up from the demonstration plant to actual production numbers. That signals to me that $AMY is sharpening their pencils at the request of their Tier-1 suitors.

For all the companies recent achievements, including their ongoing work with the U.S. Department of Energy, the trading volume on the stock indicates just how few people have ever heard about the company. The only buzz their outdated communication strategy has been generating, is similar to the noise that must have been coming from the engine on Sully Sullenberger’s plane before ditching it in the Hudson a few years back. Their technology is advanced, but to this point, their message hasn’t reached much beyond the Canadian mining community where the company has its roots. A year of blockbuster news releases has only been broadcast to a spattering of less than a thousand followers on Twitter as I write this.

American Manganese has taken in over $700k CAD via warrant exercises recently. Because of those funds, it should have an adequate cash runway to ink a deal through the first half of this year given how fiscally disciplined the management team operates. Deals seldom get done in less than three months, but that clock looks like it’s already ticking with two different Tier-One companies.

Time will tell if the chemistry for this miner turned research and development company is capable of making the stock explode, or if it simply ends with a fizzle.

Disclosure: I am/we are long AMYZF.

Additional disclosure: I/we have no postions in any other stocks mentioned other than AMYZF, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours.

American Manganese Reports 99.88% Recovery – Buy Recommendation

July 12, 2019
By Dudley Pierce Baker


American Manganese, AMY on the TSXV and AMYZF on the OTC, in my opinion, represents an interesting speculation for investors.

The company is the leader with worldwide patents for recycling lithium-ion batteries.

All of those electric car batteries, phone batteries, etc. will have to be recycled and I see AMY as having the leading technology in the industry to make this happen, not 5 years from now, not next year, but NOW.

AMY just reported on July 11th:

American Manganese Inc. Reports Initial Pilot Plant Results of 99.88% Purity from Recovered NMC Cathode Material.

In my opinion, investors seem to be overlooking this opportunity as the shares continue to trade on the TSXV Exchange (AMY) for C$0.145 and AMYZF at $0.118 in the U.S.

In full disclosure I am a shareholder of AMY and I like the story. Could I be wrong, it is possible, but I do not think so. Please do your own due diligence before buying any shares, it is your money so take responsibility for your investment decisions.

This could possibly be the most overlooked opportunity of the decade.

Visit the company's website for complete details.

Making Lithium-ion Last Forever™

American Manganese’s lithium-ion battery recycling technology achieves high recovery rates

American Manganese (TSX.V: AMY) is seeing the payoff of its efforts to develop a technology capable of recycling cathode material and generating products for lithium-ion batteries that are as close to the final form as possible.

This week, the Surrey, British Columbia-based company announced that independent lab Kemetco ran a series of tests and the results showed that AMY’s pilot plant was able to achieve high extraction rates from lithium-ion battery cathode material.

In detail, Kemetco sourced from a U.S. recycler several batches of commercially available scrap NMC, which contains lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt, and scrap NCA, which contains lithium-nickel-cobalt-aluminum battery cathode material.

Then, lab experts tested the material in stages 1 and 2 of the pilot plant operation using the technology developed by American Manganese that, earlier this month, received a patent from the United States Patent and Trade Mark Office.

American Manganese's pilot plant. Photo by AMY.

Kemetco conducted a separation of the cathode active material from aluminum foil. Subsequently, the separated active material was processed with AMY's patented method. For the NMC scrap, the average recovery rate was 94%, while for the NCA scrap the average recovery rate was 91.4%.

According to the proponents of the technology, if commercial NMC and NCA scrap cathode materials were to be used, the recovery rate would increase because such elements have an additional wash and screen.

“From the pilot plant, we have improved the handling of large quantities of commercially available material on a continuous basis, in terms of separation of active material from aluminum foils. The proven effectiveness of extraction is a great demonstration as we plan for commercial production,” said Larry Reaugh, President and CEO of American Manganese, in a media statement.

Reaugh also said that his company is moving forward with the preparation of stages 3, 4, and 5 of the pilot plant, which will include the purification and recovery of battery grade ready lithium carbonate and base metal oxides, as well as recycling of reagents and water.

“The company aims to provide these high purity recycled battery materials to lithium-ion battery manufacturers with a goal of developing a circular economy through conflict-free and sustainable methods such as AMY's patented recycling technology,” the CEO said.

The post American Manganese’s lithium-ion battery recycling technology achieves high recovery rates appeared first on MINING.com.

The inconvenient truth about batteries | TSXV:AMY


Sunday, April 7, 2019 8:30am
By Don Brunell

Each year Americans throw away more than three billion batteries constituting 180,000 tons of hazardous material and the situation is likely to get much worse as the world shifts to electric vehicles.

Everyday-green.com reports more than 86,000 tons of single-use alkaline batteries (AAA, AA, C and D) are thrown away. They power electronic toys and games, portable audio equipment and flashlights and make up 20 percent of the household hazardous materials in our garbage dumps.

Unlike composted waste, batteries are hazardous and contaminate our environment, particularly our drinking water. Even though the harmful materials are tightly encased, the casing is often crushed during landfilling. The spent batteries contain toxic acids and metals such as mercury, nickel, cadmium, cobalt and lead.

While it is convenient to just chuck used batteries into the trash, the more expensive rechargeable types can be used up to a thousand times more than the single-use types, but recharging is inconvenient, time-consuming and robs counter space.

Today, America is a throw-away country bent on simple, convenient solutions. Even where there are recycling programs, too many recyclables end up in the trash. Things are about to change dramatically as more electric vehicles populate our roads and our government and manufacturers deal with the growing backlog of old car batteries.

The Guardian reported the number of electric cars worldwide surpassed two million in 2017. The International Energy Agency estimates there will be 140 million electrics globally by 2030 leaving behind 11 million tons of spent lithium-ion batteries in need of recycling. That is a herculean task considering last year only five percent of the European Union’s electric car batteries were recycled.

The good news is automakers are actively looking for ways to extend the life of lithium batteries. Reprocessing spent batteries is getting more attention as manufacturers increase demand for metals, particularly cobalt, which are already in short supply.

One approach is converting car batteries for household use. The Guardian reports Aceleron, a hi-tech British startup, plans to take electric car batteries which still have 70 percent of their capacity and repackaging them for growing home energy storage.

American Manganese, Incorporated, a Surrey, B.C. company, has patented a process which recovers lithium, cobalt, nickel, manganese and aluminum from cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries. AMY, which has a pilot plant in operation near Vancouver, B.C., is partnering with the United States Department of Energy to bring the process into commercial production.

AMY trades on the TSX Venture Exchange.

AMY uses a leaching and precipitation method to recover the metals. Currently, the cathodes are smelted and only a portion of the cobalt is salvaged, but virtually no lithium.

The new technology is of particular interest to our nation which imports three-fourths of its cobalt, half of its lithium and all of its manganese.

To be competitive, American lithium battery makers need to have reliable supplies of critical metals and be cost competitive worldwide.

China, which plans to put six million electric cars on the roads by 2025, has recently slowed its electric production; however, China still has plenty of willing investors. Last year VW, Daimler, Toyota, Ford, the Renault-Nissan alliance and GM all announced joint-ventures to produce electric vehicles in China.

One reason is China has been stockpiling critical metals and its buying spree has been partly responsible for the 2017 surge in the price of cobalt which was 2.5 times greater than 2016.

Our opportunity is finding new environmentally and economically feasible ways to reprocess all spent batteries and prevent them from being trucked off to landfills. Enterprising Americans will find ways to make recycling more convenient in our homes and at work if it is possible to make it profitable.

Don Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

American Manganese’s lithium-ion battery recycling technology granted patent

The United States Patent and Trade Mark Office issued today patent No. 10,246,343 for American Manganese’s (TSX.V: AMY) lithium-ion battery cathode material recycling technology.

In a press release, the Surrey, British Columbia-based company indicated that the granting of the patent constitutes a milestone as it provides legal protection of its flagship technology.

“It is extremely exciting to have the opportunity to potentially contribute to the sustainability of future global electrification,” – Norm Chow

“When developing this technology, we looked at current methods of recycling waste lithium-ion batteries and discovered high heat smelting to be the primary method,” said Norm Chow, inventor of AMY's technology, in the media brief. “Because active cathode materials are oxides, the first thing that came to mind was the comparison to steelmaking. Since smelting iron ore in steelmaking generates a considerable amount of CO2, we were compelled to develop an alternative process with a sustainable focus. During research development, we applied Near Net Shape manufacturing principles with the goal of efficiently recycling cathode material and generating products as close to the final form as possible, with minimum processing steps.”

In Chow’s view, the granting of the U.S. Patent confirms that his firm’s research is both novel and inventive.

Comparing traditional mining for lithium with the company’s technology, the executive highlighted major differences such as the fact that the extraction of all cathode metals is done from lithium-ion batteries as opposed to having to mine different ores and go through the processes of smelting and refining with solvent extraction and electrowinning, re-dissolving the metals with acid and crystallizing them to make metal sulfates. The new approach -he said- entails the precipitation of base metal oxides and lithium carbonate and its output is base metal oxides and lithium carbonate with a stoichiometric make-up of metals, ready for battery manufacturers to utilize.

“Instead of relying on acquiring and developing mines in high-risk jurisdictions to supply the growing demand for battery materials, AMY aims to have its patented urban mining technology provide a sustainable and geopolitically friendly supply of battery materials,” Chow suggested.

The post American Manganese’s lithium-ion battery recycling technology granted patent appeared first on MINING.com.

American Manganese to help US government recover lithium-ion battery materials

American Manganese (TSX.V: AMY) announced this week that it will participate in a U.S. Department of Energy project to advance the economic recovery of lithium-ion battery materials from electric vehicles and other consumer goods.

In a press release, the British Columbia-based firm explained that the project is titled "Lithium-Ion Battery Disassembly, Remanufacturing, and Lithium & Cobalt Recovery Project" and it focuses on developing an economic recovery strategy for critical materials in end-of-use lithium-ion batteries from electric and hybrid electric vehicles and bicycles, as well as from power tools.

Other AMY partners include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Idaho National Lab, Purdue University and Case Western Reserve University.

"AMY is very pleased to become the first private-sector company to participate in this project," said Larry Reaugh, CEO of American Manganese, in the media brief. "We're honored to be working with world-renowned national labs and leading U.S. universities on an issue that will dramatically impact our ability to meet rising material demand for lithium, cobalt, manganese and nickel."

Reaugh noted that the work starts immediately under the supervision of the Critical Materials Institute, which is an energy innovation hub led by Ames Laboratory and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and Advanced Manufacturing Office.

The post American Manganese to help US government recover lithium-ion battery materials appeared first on MINING.com.

American Manganese continues processing cathode scraps

Extraction Results Meet Company’s High Expectations

CEO: “EV and Battery Manufacturers… Already Conducting Due Diligence on [AMY] Process”

Larry W. Reaugh, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Manganese Inc. (“American Manganese” or “AMY” or the “Company”), is pleased to report that additional NCA and NMC cathode scraps have been processed successfully through Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the Company’s pilot plant project. Using the Company’s patent-approved process, the scraps underwent separation and leach operations yielding a pregnant leach solution (PLS) containing cathode metals (cobalt, lithium, nickel and manganese) in quantities which meet the Company’s high expectations. More than 500L of PLS have now been collected for further testing and prepared for the remaining three stages of the pilot plant project.

“The pilot plant testing procedure is done in a manner that helps collect valuable operational data that will help us optimize the pilot plant for testing at a continuous rate once all stages are complete,” said Mr. Reaugh. “While the pilot plant testing is expected to be complete by end of May 2019, EV and battery manufacturers are already conducting due diligence on our process.”

 

 

 

About Kemetco Research Inc.
Kemetco Research is a private sector integrated science, technology and innovation company. Their Contract Sciences operation provides laboratory analysis and testing, field work, bench scale studies, pilot plant investigations, consulting services, applied research and development for both industry and government. Their clients range from start-up companies developing new technologies through to large multinational corporations with proven processes.

Kemetco provides scientific expertise in the fields of Specialty Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Process and Extractive Metallurgy. Because Kemetco carries out research in many different fields, it can offer a broader range of backgrounds and expertise than most laboratories.

About American Manganese Inc.
American Manganese Inc. is a critical metal company with a patent approved process for the recovery of metals from lithium-ion batteries such as cobalt, lithium, nickel, manganese, and aluminum. Using a novel combination of reagents and unit operations, AMY can provide 100% extraction of cathode metals at battery grade purity. American Manganese Inc. aims to capitalize on its patent approved technology and proprietary know-how to become the industry leader in recycling spent electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries (Please see the Company’s Dec 14, 2018 Business Plan (“CBP”) for further details).

On behalf of Management

AMERICAN MANGANESE INC.

Larry W. Reaugh
President and Chief Executive Officer

American Manganese moves forward with plans to recycle lithium-ion battery materials

American Manganese (TSX.V: AMY; FRANK: 2AM) announced this week that its partner, Kemetco Research, started the processing of a select sample of cathode scrap material through Stages 1 and 2 of a Pilot Plant built to recycle cobalt, nickel, manganese, and aluminum.

In a press release, the Surrey-based company explained that the commencement of the pilot plant followed a hazard and operability study and preliminary testing of all the unit operations in the first two processing stages.

Scrap battery cathode material. Photo by American Manganese.

The exploration firm also provided details as to what are the different stages of its hydrometallurgical plant aimed at generating a continued recovery of cathode material.

Stage 1 – Pre-treatment of cathode material
Stage 2 – Leach of active material
Stage 3 – Purification
Stage 4 – Recovery of base metals
Stage 5 – Lithium recovery and water recycle

According to Norman Chow, President of Kemetco Research, having gone through the first couple of phases is a great accomplishment for American Manganese, as it moves forward in its quest to prove its patent-approved lithium-ion battery recycling technology.

"This is a great milestone for the company as we work towards a complete lithium-ion battery recycling process. The company is also anticipating an official U.S. Patent number for its recently approved patent application,” Reaugh said in the media statement.

In previous releases, American Manganese has cited industry sources as saying that up to 10% of manufactured lithium-ion battery cathodes are rejected for use. The rejected cathodes, termed ‘scrap,’ consist of the aluminum foil backing and the cathode metal powder which, in the firm’s view, can be recycled into usable cathode material.

The post American Manganese moves forward with plans to recycle lithium-ion battery materials appeared first on MINING.com.

American Manganese Inc. Commences Testing of Lithium-ion Battery Materials Recycling Pilot Plant

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Successful Unit Operation Tests

Larry W. Reaugh, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Manganese Inc. (“American Manganese” or “AMY” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce that AMY’s processing partner, Kemetco Research, has commenced the processing of a select sample of cathode scrap material through Stages 1 and 2 of the Pilot Plant. The commencement of the pilot plant followed a HAZOP study and preliminary testing of all the unit operations in Stage 1 and Stage 2.

The complete five-stage Pilot Plant operation will progress as follows:

Stage 1 – Pre-treatment of cathode material

Stage 2 – Leach of active material

Stage 3 – Purification

Stage 4 – Recovery of base metals (e.g., nickel, cobalt, manganese)

Stage 5 – Lithium recovery and water recycle

“The commencement of the Pilot Plant operations marks a significant step in American Manganese’s quest to prove its patent-approved lithium-ion battery recycling technology.” said Mr. Norman Chow, President of Kemetco Research Inc.  “Kemetco is proud to partner with American Manganese in developing this innovative technology.”

“This is a great milestone for the Company as we work towards a complete lithium-ion battery recycling process. The Company is also anticipating an official U.S. Patent number for its recently approved patent application. The Company will continue to report on all future advancements,” said Mr. Reaugh.

About Kemetco Research Inc.
Kemetco Research is a private sector integrated science, technology and innovation company. Their Contract Sciences operation provides laboratory analysis and testing, field work, bench scale studies, pilot plant investigations, consulting services, applied research and development for both industry and government. Their clients range from start-up companies developing new technologies through to large multinational corporations with proven processes.

Kemetco provides scientific expertise in the fields of Specialty Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Process and Extractive Metallurgy. Because Kemetco carries out research in many different fields, it can offer a broader range of backgrounds and expertise than most laboratories.

About American Manganese Inc.
American Manganese Inc. is a critical metal company with a patent approved process for the recovery of metals from lithium-ion batteries such as cobalt, lithium, nickel, manganese, and aluminum. Using a novel combination of reagents and unit operations, AMY can provide 100% extraction of cathode metals at battery grade purity. American Manganese Inc. aims to capitalize on its patent approved technology and proprietary know-how to become the industry leader in recycling spent electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries (Please see the Company’s Dec 14, 2018 Business Plan (“CBP”) for further details).

On behalf of Management

AMERICAN MANGANESE INC.

Larry W. Reaugh
President and Chief Executive Officer

Disclosure from Dudley Pierce Baker, Editor, http://JuniorMiningNews.com and http://CommonStockWarrants.com.

“AMY is one of my top investment positions and I really like this developing story.”

American Manganese Inc. Pilot Plant Arrives at Kemetco Testing Facility


January 18, 2018
Press Release
J

Documentation and Fees Submitted for Formal Patent Issuance

Discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy and Defense

Larry W. Reaugh, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Manganese Inc. (“American Manganese” or “AMY” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce that Stages 1 and 2 of the Pilot Plant have arrived at the Kemetco Research facility in Richmond, Canada. Kemetco has begun configuration and commissioning in preparation for the processing of one metric tonne of pre-production cathode scrap material (500kg of NMC and 500kg of NCA). The Company continues to believe cathode scrap recycling represents a compelling near-term opportunity for its shareholders as well as for industry participants including lithium-ion battery manufacturers.

Additionally, the Company has completed documentation and submitted fees for the formal issuance of its U.S. Patent.  AMY expects to be issued a formal patent number within the next few weeks for its method of achieving 100% recovery of cobalt, nickel, manganese, lithium, and aluminum from lithium-ion battery cathode materials.

“As we begin our Pilot Plant testing, we are thrilled to see that the U.S. Department of Energy recognizes the importance of lithium-ion battery recycling technology”, said Mr. Reaugh. “We continue to hold discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy for our recycling technology as well as the U.S. Department of Defense for our initial patented process of low-grade manganese ore recovery – one of the 23 critical minerals listed in the U.S. Executive Order.”

About Kemetco Research Inc.
Kemetco Research is a private sector integrated science, technology and innovation company. Their Contract Sciences operation provides laboratory analysis and testing, field work, bench scale studies, pilot plant investigations, consulting services, applied research and development for both industry and government. Their clients range from start-up companies developing new technologies through to large multinational corporations with proven processes.

Kemetco provides scientific expertise in the fields of Specialty Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Process and Extractive Metallurgy. Because Kemetco carries out research in many different fields, it can offer a broader range of backgrounds and expertise than most laboratories.

About American Manganese Inc.
American Manganese Inc. is a critical metal company with a patent approved process for the recovery of metals from lithium-ion batteries such as cobalt, lithium, nickel, manganese, and aluminum. Using a novel combination of reagents and unit operations, AMY can provide 100% extraction of cathode metals at battery grade purity. American Manganese Inc. aims to capitalize on its patent approved technology and proprietary know-how to become the industry leader in recycling spent electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries (Please see the Company’s Dec 14, 2018 Business Plan (“CBP”) for further details).

On behalf of Management

AMERICAN MANGANESE INC.

Larry W. Reaugh
President and Chief Executive Officer