New Multi-year Gold Rally Has Emerged

This post New Multi-year Gold Rally Has Emerged appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

The dollar price of gold has been on a roller-coaster ride for the past six years. But the past six weeks have been a turbocharged version of that. Investors should expect more of the same for reasons explained below.

The six-year story is the more important for investors and also the more frustrating. Gold staged an historic bull market rally from 1999 to 2011, going from about $250 per ounce to $1,900 per ounce, a 650% gain.

Then, gold nose-dived into a bear market from 2011 to 2015, falling to $1,050 per ounce in December 2015, a 45% crash from the peak and a 51% retracement of the 1999-2011 bull market. (Renowned investor Jim Rogers once told me that no commodity goes from a base price to the stratosphere without a 50% retracement along the way. Mission accomplished!)

During that precipitous decline after 2011, gold hit a level of $1,417 per ounce in August 2013. It was the last time gold would see a $1,400 per ounce handle until last month when gold briefly hit $1,440 per ounce on an intra-day basis. At last, the six-year trading range was broken. Better yet, gold hit $1,400 on the way up, not on the way down.

The range-bound trading from 2013 to 2019 was long and tiring for long-term gold investors. Gold had rallied to $1,380 per ounce in May 2014, $1,300 per ounce in January 2015, and $1,363 per ounce in July 2016 (a post-Brexit bounce).

But, for every rally there was a trough. Gold fell to $1,087 per ounce in August 2015 and $1,050 per ounce in December 2015. The bigger picture was that gold was trading in a range. The range was approximately $1,365 per ounce at the top and $1,050 per ounce at the bottom, with lots of ups and downs in between. Yet, nothing seemed capable of breaking gold out of that range.

The good news is that gold has now broken out to the upside. The $1,440 per ounce level is well within reach and the $1,400 per ounce level seems like a solid floor, despite occasional dips into $1,390 per ounce territory. Gold’s trading at $1,416 today.

More importantly, a new multi-year bull market has now emerged. Turning points from bear to bull markets (and vice versa) are not always recognized in real time because investors and analysts are too wedded to the old story to see that the new story has already started.

But, looking back it’s clear that the bear market ended in December 2015 at the $1,050 per ounce level and a new bull market, now in its fourth year, is solidly intact. The recent break-out to the $1,440 per ounce level is a strong 37% gain for the new bull market. This price break-out has far to run. (The 1971 – 1980 bull market gained over 2,100%, and the 1999 – 2011 bull market gained over 650%).

The price action over the past six weeks has been even wilder than the price action over the past six years. As late as May 29, 2019, gold was languishing at $1,280 per ounce. Then it took off like a rocket to $1,420 per ounce by June 25, 2019, an 11% gain in just four weeks.

Gold just as quickly backed-down to $1,382 per ounce on July 1, rallied back to $1,418 per ounce on July 3, and fell again to $1,398 per ounce on July 5. These daily price swings of 1.5% are the new normal in gold. Again, the good news is that the $1,400 per ounce floor seems intact.

What’s driving the new gold bull market?

From both a long-term and short-term perspective, there are three principal drivers: geopolitics, supply and demand, and Fed interest rate policy; (the dollar price of gold is just the inverse of dollar strength. A strong dollar = a lower dollar price of gold, and a weak dollar = a higher dollar price of gold. Fed rate policy determines if the dollar is strong or weak).

The first two factors have been driving the price of gold higher since 2015 and will continue to do so. Geopolitical hot spots (Korea, Crimea, Iran, Venezuela, China and Syria) remain unresolved and most are getting worse. Each flare-up drives a flight-to-safety that boosts gold along with Treasury notes.

The supply/demand situation remains favorable with Russia and China buying over 50 tons per month to build up their reserves while global mining output has been flat for five years.

The third factor, Fed policy, is the hardest to forecast and the most powerful on a day-to-day basis. The Fed has a policy rate-setting meeting on July 31. There is almost no chance the Fed will raise rates. The issue is whether they will cut rates or stand pat.

The case for cutting rates is strong. U.S. growth slowed in the second-quarter to 1.3% (according to the most recent estimate) from an annualized 3.1% in the first-quarter of 2019. Inflation continues to miss the Fed’s target of 2.0% year-over-year and has been declining recently. Trade war fears are adding to a global growth slowdown.

On the other hand, the June employment report showed strong job creation, continued wage gains, and increase labor force participation. All of those indicators correspond to higher future inflation under Fed models. The G20 summit between President Trump and President Xi of China led to a truce in the U.S.-China trade war and the prospect of continued talks to end the trade war.

In short, there’s plenty of data to support rate cuts or no cuts in July. The Fed is biding its time. Meanwhile, the market is highly uncertain. A good headline on trade results in a stronger dollar and weaker gold. The next day, a bad headline on growth results in a weaker dollar and stronger gold.

This dynamic explains the erratic up-and-down price movements of the past week. The dynamic is likely to continue right up until the July 31 Fed meeting in two weeks.

With so much uncertainty and volatility in the dollar price of gold lately, what is the prospect for a rally in precious metals prices and stocks that track them?

Right now, my models are telling us that the gold rally will continue regardless of the Fed’s action on July 31.

Expectations today are that the Fed will cut rates at the next FOMC meeting, but the probabilities are far from a sure thing. If the Fed cuts rates, the market will simply move its expectations of further rate cuts to the next FOMC meeting (September 18). The weak dollar/strong gold rally will continue.

If the Fed does not cut rates, gold may suffer a short-term drawdown, but markets will assume the Fed made a mistake. Expectations for a 50bp (0.5%) rate cut in September will start to build.

That new forward expectation will power gold higher just as surely as the missed July rate cut. That covers gold. But what about silver?

Many investors assume there is a baseline silver/gold price ratio of 16:1. They look at the actual silver/gold price ratio of 100:1 and assume that silver is poised for a 600% rally to restore the 16:1 ratio. These same investors tend to blame “manipulation” for silver’s underperformance.

That analysis is almost entirely nonsense. There is no baseline silver/gold ratio. (The “16:1 ratio” is an historical legacy from silver mining lobbying in the late 19th century, a time of deflation, when farmers and miners were trying to ease the money supply by inflating the price of silver with a legislative link to gold.

The result was “bimetallism,” an early form of QE. The ratio had nothing to do with supply/demand, geology, or any other fundamental factor. Bimetallism failed and was replaced with a strict gold standard in 1900).

This does not mean there is no correlation between gold and silver prices. As Chart 1 below reveals, there is a moderately strong correlation between the two. The coefficient of determination (expressed as r2) is 0.9.

This means that over 80% of the movement in the price of silver can be explained by movements in the price of gold. The remaining silver price factors involve industrial demand unrelated to gold prices.

Chart 1

Read more here.

Recently, a huge gap has opened up between the rally in gold prices (shown in blue on Chart 1 with a right-hand scale) compared to silver prices (shown in orange on Chart 1 with a left-hand scale).

Given the historically high correlation between gold and silver price movements, and the recent lag in the silver rally, the analysis suggests that either gold will fall sharply or silver will rally sharply.

Since I have articulated the case for continued strength in gold prices, my expectation is that gold will continue to outpace silver.

Either way, both metals are heading higher.

Regards,

Jim Rickards
for The Daily Reckoning

The post New Multi-year Gold Rally Has Emerged appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

If Gold Was Just a Barbarous Relic…

This post If Gold Was Just a Barbarous Relic… appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

There’s nothing new about the Russian accumulation of gold bullion in their reserve position. It began in a material way in 2009 when Russia had about 600 metric tonnes of gold.

Today, Russia has 2,183 metric tonnes, a stunning 264% increase in less than 10 years. Russia is the sixth-largest gold power in the world after the U.S., Germany, IMF, Italy and France.

Russia’s gold hoard is over 25% of the U.S. hoard, but Russia’s economy is only 8% the size of the U.S. economy. This gives Russia a gold-to-GDP ratio over three times that of the U.S.

While these developments are well-known, the question of why Russia is accumulating so much gold has never been answered.

One reason is as a dollar hedge. Russia is the second-largest energy producer in the world. Most of that energy is sold for dollars. Russia can hedge potential dollar inflation by buying gold.

Another reason has to do with the avoidance of U.S. sanctions. Gold is nondigital and does not move through electronic payments systems, so it is impossible for the U.S. to freeze on interdict.

Yet a deeper reason is that Russia has a long-term plan to subvert the dollar’s role as the leading global reserve currency. The Russian ruble is not positioned to be a reserve currency, but a new cryptocurrency backed by gold would be a good candidate.

The Central Bank of Russia will consider a new study that suggests just such a gold-backed cryptocurrency to settle balance of payments among willing participants. This plan is in its preliminary stages and is a long way from reality at this point.

Still, the Russian endgame has now been revealed. The dollar’s days as the leading reserve currency are numbered.

Of course, Russia is not the only nation accumulating gold as a means to move away from the dollar. You can certainly add China to that list, and many others.

The latest move comes from Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. He promoted the idea of a common trading currency for East Asia that would be pegged to gold. “The currency that we propose should be based on gold because gold is much more stable,” he said.

I’ve actually advised Mahathir Mohamad in the past and he’s very familiar with my writings on gold. So I’m not surprised he’s issuing this call.

The global monetary regime has collapsed three times over the past 100 years, in 1914, 1939, and 1971. They seem to happen about every 30 to 40 years on average. It’s now been over 40 years since the last collapse, so we’re due.

Got gold?

Below, I show you why gold is heading for a powerful breakout. And yes, it involves the world’s central banks. Read on.

Regards,

Jim Rickards
for The Daily Reckoning

The post If Gold Was Just a Barbarous Relic… appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

Ron Paul Says to Watch the Petrodollar

Ron Paul Says to Watch the Petrodollar By Nick Giambruno The chaos that one day will ensue from our 35-year experiment with worldwide fiat money will require a return to money of real value. We will know that day is approaching when oil-producing countries demand gold, or its equivalent, for their oil rather than dollars or euros. The sooner the better. – Ron Paul Ron Paul is calling for the end of the petrodollar system. This system is one of the main reasons the U.S. dollar is the world’s premier reserve currency. Essentially, Paul is saying that understanding the petrodollar system and the forces affecting it is the best way to predict when the U.S. dollar will collapse. Paul and I discussed this extensively at one of the Casey Research Summits. He told me he stands by his assessment. Nick Giambruno and Ron Paul This is critically important. When the … Continue reading

The International War On Cash

The International War on Cash By Jeff Thomas Back in 2008, I began warning of increasing capital controls that we would see in the future, as a component in the decline of Western economies (Western in the broad sense, including Japan, Australia, etc.) Along the way, it occurred to me that, at some point, governments might collectively attempt to eliminate paper currency in favour of an electronic currency – transferred from party to party solely through licensed banks. Sound farfetched? Well, maybe, but what if the U.S. and EU agreed on an overall plan, then suggested it to other governments? On the face of it, this smacks of conspiracy theory, yet certainly, all governments would benefit from this control and would be likely to get on board. In fact, it might prove to be the only way out of their present economic problems. So, how would it play out? Here’s … Continue reading

China: No need to depreciate yuan after IMF move

December 1, 2015 Lindling Wei BEIJING–China will keep its currency at a “reasonable” level and sees no need for depreciation, a top central-bank official said. The comments from People’s Bank of China Vice Governor Yi Gang came hours after the International Monetary Fund added China’s yuan to its basket of reserve currencies, known as Special Drawing Rights, or SDR. The move prompted speculation that China would let the currency drift lower. Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, Mr. Yi said the central bank doesn’t see reason for depreciation, pointing to China’s economic strength and ample foreign-exchange reserves. “If the worry is the renminbi would depreciate sharply after its inclusion in the SDR, there’s no need for that,” Mr. Yi said. Renminbi is an alternative name for the yuan. Mr. Yi said China’s long-term goal is to allow a “clean float” of the yuan — meaning the central bank will … Continue reading

Martin Armstrong – Gold Set To Rise To $5000.00

usawatchdogusawatchdog.com
APRIL 13, 2015

 

Published on Apr 12, 2015

Renowned financial analyst Martin Armstrong says you can forget about the U.S. dollar crashing in value. Armstrong contends, “No, that’s absurd. The euro is in terrible shape. The yen is in terrible shape, and honestly, you can’t park money in yuan or Russian rubles, yet. I mean, let’s be realistic here, but eventually–yes.”

Armstrong says the bond market is a different story as the Fed is going to be forced to raise rates. He contends just a few percentage points in rising rates are going to cause big losses and big changes. Armstrong predicts, “People will be losing huge money. We are looking at a few percentage points, and you are going to blow the national debts of all these countries way out of whack, and that’s what’s going to force political change.”

Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Martin Armstrong of ArmstrongEconomics.com.

The Titanic Sinks At Dawn

Posted on March 19, 2015 by Gary Christenson TheDeviantInvestor.com What Titanic?  The RMS Titanic, or any of the following: A titanic quantity of derivatives – say 1,000 Trillion dollars. A derivative crash was at the center of the 2008 market meltdown.  It could happen again since there is now more debt, leverage, and risk than in 2008. A titanic accumulation of debt – global debt is approximately $200 Trillion. Global population is about 7,000,000,000 so there is about $28,000 in debt per living human being.  If global debt were backed by all the gold mined in the history of the world, an ounce of gold would back $36,000 in debt.  Gold currently sells for less than $1,200.  Gold is undervalued and there is an excess of debt. A titanic increase in debt in the past decade. Official US debt increased by over $10,000,000,000,000 in the past ten years.  What did … Continue reading

Join Our Team For Greater Gains

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January 25, 2015
Dudley Pierce Baker

 

All of my subscribers are considered by me to be part of our team here
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If any subscribers see something of interest in the stock warrant arena, I
want to hear from you via email to support@commonstockwarrants.com,
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 As a subscriber, if you are great at technicals, charts, hedging strategies, timing
the markets, etc., again, I want to hear from you. After feedback is received I may share content with other team members based upon my personal discretion.

I believe that this new approach will be for the greater good as
we are all in these markets together.

To my current subscribers, I value your participation and support of our unique
services, some of you for many, many years.

If you are not a current subscriber I encourage you to join our team now.
Not familar with stock warrants? Read my previous article,
How to trade with warrants, originally posted on FuturesMag.com.

There are many great opportunities with stock warrants and I see great
volitility in the markets for all sectors perhaps culminating in substantially
higher prices over the next several years and we look for the peak in 2017.

Dudley Pierce Baker
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What the Strong Dollar Does to Yellow and Black Gold and Why We’re Seeing Green

Frank Holmes

Frank Holmes

Editors Note: This is still a very timely read based upon what has been since October 2014 to the price of the USD, gold and oil.

October 20, 2014
Frank Holmes

The United States is doing better than it has in years. Jobs growth is up, unemployment is down, our manufacturing sector carries the rest of the world on its shoulders like a wounded soldier and the World Economic Forum named the U.S. the third-most competitive nation, our highest ranking since before the recession.

As heretical as it sounds, there’s a downside to America’s success, and that’s a stronger dollar. Although our currency has softened recently, it has put pressure on two commodities that we consider our lifeblood at U.S. Global Investors: gold and oil.

strong dollar has put pressure on both gold and oilIt’s worth noting that we’ve been here before. In October 2011, a similar correction occurred in energy, commodities and resources stocks based on European and Chinese growth fears. But international economic stimulus measures helped raise market confidence, and many of the companies we now own within these sectors benefited. Between October 2011 and January 2012, Anadarko Petroleum rose 58 percent; Canadian Natural Resources, 20 percent; Devon Energy, 15 percent; Cimarex Energy, 15 percent; Peyto Exploration & Development, 15 percent; and Suncor Energy, 10 percent.

Granted, we face new challenges this year that have caused market jitters—Ebola and ISIS, just to name a couple. But we’re confident that once the dollar begins to revert back to the mean, a rally in energy and resources stocks might soon follow. Brian Hicks, portfolio manager of our Global Resources Fund (PSPFX), notes that he’s been nibbling on cheap stocks ahead of a potential rally, one that, he hopes, mimics what we saw in late 2011 and early 2012.

A repeat of last year’s abnormally frigid winter, though unpleasant, might help heat up some of the sectors and companies that have underperformed lately.

September Was the Cruelest Month

On the left side of the chart below, you can see 45 years’ worth of data that show fairly subdued fluctuations in gold prices in relation to the dollar. On the right side, by contrast, you can see that the strong dollar pushed bullion prices down 6 percent in September, historically gold’s strongest month. This move is unusual also because gold has had a monthly standard deviation of ±5.5 percent based on the last 10 years’ worth of data.

Strong Contrast in 2014 Gold and Dollar Changes vs Historic Averages
click to enlarge

Here’s another way of looking at it. On October 3, bullion fell below $1,200 to prices we haven’t seen since 2010, but they quickly rebounded to the $1,240 range as the dollar index receded from its peak the same day.

A-Strong-US-Dollar-Keeps-Gold-and-Oil-Prices-Low
click to enlarge

There’s no need to worry just yet. This isn’t 2013, when the metal gave back 28 percent. And despite the correction, would it surprise you to learn that gold has actually outperformed several of the major stock indices this year?

Gold-is-Outperforming-All-but-the-SP-500-Index
click to enlarge

As for gold stocks, there’s no denying the facts: With few exceptions, they’ve been taken to the woodshed. September was demonstrably cruel. Based on the last five years’ worth of data, the NYSE Arca Gold BUGS Index has had a monthly standard deviation of ±9.4, but last month it plunged 20 percent. We haven’t seen such a one-month dip since April 2013. This volatility exemplifies why we always advocate for no more than a 10 percent combined allocation to gold and gold stocks in investor portfolios.
_________________

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___________________

Oil’s slump is a little more complicated to explain.

Since the end of World War II, black gold has been priced in U.S. greenbacks. This means that when our currency fluctuates as dramatically as it has recently, it affects every other nation’s consumption of crude. Oil, then, has become much more expensive lately for the slowing European and Asian markets. Weaker purchasing power equals less overseas oil demand equals even lower prices.

What some people are calling the American energy renaissance has also led to lower oil prices. Spurred by more efficient extraction techniques such as fracking, the U.S. has been producing over 8.5 million barrels a day, the highest domestic production level since 1986. We’re awash in the stuff, with supply outpacing demand. Whereas the rest of the world has flat-lined in terms of oil production, the U.S. has zoomed to 30-year highs.

In a way, American shale oil has become a victim of its own success.

Domestic-Crude-Oil-Production-Riding-Sharply-as-the-Rest-of-the-World-Has-Flat-Lined
click to enlarge

At the end of next month, members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) are scheduled to meet in Vienna. As Brian speculated during our most recent webcast, it would be surprising if we didn’t see another production cut. With Brent oil for November delivery at $83 a barrel—a four-year low—many oil-rich countries, including Iran, Iraq and Venezuela and Saudi Arabia, will have a hard time balancing their books. Venezuela, in fact, has been clamoring for an emergency meeting ahead of November to make a plea for production cuts.

Producer-country-budget-breakeven-prices
click to enlarge

Although not an OPEC member, Russia, once the world’s largest producer of crude, is being squeezed by plunging oil prices on the left, international sanctions on the right. This might prompt President Vladimir Putin to scale back the country’s presence in Ukraine and delay a multibillion-dollar revamp of its armed forces. When the upgrade was approved in 2011, GDP growth was expected to hold at 6 percent. But now as a result of the sanctions and dropping oil prices, Russia faces a dismally flat 0.5 percent.

Volatility Has Returned

The current all-in sustaining cost to produce one ounce of gold is hovering between $1,000 and $1,200. With the price of bullion where it is, many miners can barely break even. Production has been down 10 percent because it’s become costlier to excavate. As I told Kitco News’ Daniela Cambone, we will probably start seeing supply shrinkage in North and South America and Africa.

The same could happen to oil production. Extraction of shale oil here in the U.S. costs companies between $50 and $100 a barrel, with producers able to break even at around $80 to $85. If prices slide even further, drillers might be forced to trim their capital budgets or even shelve new projects.

Michael Levi of the Council on Foreign Relations told NPR’s Audie Cornish that a decrease in drilling could hurt certain commodities:

“[I]f prices fall far enough for long enough, you’ll see a pullback in drilling. And shale drilling uses a lot of manufactured goods—20 percent of what people spend on a well is steel, 10 percent is cement, so less drilling means less manufacturing in those sectors.”

At the same time, Levi places oil prices in a long-term context, reminding listeners that we’ve become accustomed to unusually high prices for the last three years.

“People were starting to believe that this was permanent, and they were wrong,” he said. “So the big news is that volatility is back.”

On this note, be sure to visit our interactive and perennially popular Periodic Table of Commodities,which you can modify to view gold and oil’s performance going back ten years.

A Penny Saved Is a Billion Dollars To Spend and Invest

With fresh volatility in oil production comes the fear that the most price-sensitive states will be hurt the most. Exceptionally vulnerable states include Oklahoma, Wyoming and North Dakota. Texas, the nation’s leading oil producer—one of the world’s top producers, in fact—is diversified well enough to not feel the pain as much.

What’s bad for oil producers, though, turns out to be good for American consumers, who are already benefiting from lower gasoline prices. As of this writing, the national average for a gallon of gas is $3.10, down from $3.35 a year ago, according to AAA’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report.

As a result, American consumers are looking at huge savings—$40 billion this year alone. According to Deutsche Bank’s Joe LaVogna, every penny that’s saved at the pump equates to a billion dollars in household energy consumption that can be put back into the economy in other ways.

Lower Gas Prices Will Save the U.S. $40 Billion in Annual Energy Costs
click to enlarge

I like to think of this as an unexpected and very welcome tax break. Automobile sales are already up from 2009. Lower gas prices might encourage some families to spring for that Suburban instead of a Prius.

Vehicle-Sales-in-the-US-Have-Accelerated-Steadily-Since-2009
click to enlarge

Klondex Turning Heads and Profits

As I said earlier, gold stocks have been hurting lately. One mining company that’s managed to not only survive in this uncertain climate but actually thrive is Klondex Mines, our largest holding in both ourGold and Precious Metals Fund (USERX) and World Precious Minerals Fund (UNWPX), with additional exposure in our Global Resources Fund (PSPFX). Headquartered in Vancouver, Klondex has complete ownership and control of the Fire Creek Project and Midas Mine, both in Nevada.

The chart below, based on our own research, shows Klondex’s relative strength to its peers and why we find the company so attractive in the long term. The y-axis indicates profit margin, the x-axis, enterprise value. The size of the spheres represents the amount of revenue generated by each one of these companies in the second quarter of 2014, Klondex’s first quarter of full commercial production.

Klondex-mines-looks-attractive-against-peers-in-second-quarter
click to enlarge

What the chart conveys is that, in relation to its peers, Klondex has a significantly higher profit margin than companies with a market cap two to three times its size.

“This is going to be very positive for Klondex shareholders as we go into the year-end,” portfolio manager Ralph Aldis said during our webcast. “The third quarter should be another great quarter, and that’s when people will say, ‘Hey, that second quarter report wasn’t a fluke.’ They’re going to start buying the stock and get it moving.”

Indeed, Klondex has managed to stay above the Market Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF for the 12-month period, delivering a positive return of 7 percent versus the index’s -7.5 percent.

Klondex-Mines-Outperforms-the-market-Vectors-Junior-Gold-Miners-ETF
click to enlarge

On numerous occasions I’ve written about our research on the typical lifecycle of a mine, most recently in my whitepaper “Managing Expectations: Anticipate Before You Participate in the Market.” Below you can see the relationship between a mine’s lifecycle and the company’s share price.

Life-cycle-of-a-mine
click to enlarge

As experts in mining stocks, it’s imperative for us to know which production stage the mine is in to manage our exposure to the company.

In the case of Klondex, its price action mimics the movements in share price based on the chart above, confirming our research.

Klondex-Mine-Moves-in-Tandem-with-Mine-Life-Cycle
click to enlarge

It also supports the benefits of active management.

“When you buy an indexed fund, you’re basically just buying the market capitalization of those companies,” Ralph said. “You’re not getting the benefit of active management where we go out, meet the company’s management team and know its history. We’re familiar with the lifecycle of the mine in question, the money, the burn rate and the minerals the company is involved in.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself.

Speaking of Active Management…

John-Derrick-Spurs-game-Istanbul-Turkey-GreeceLast week I expressed my concerns disapproval of how the European Union is handling (or not handling) its fiscal and monetary mess. Because the EU is such an important region for the global economy, investors have become impatient with the bickering that’s stalled any clear solution to its slowdown.

Last week I was in Italy meeting with other global business leaders, while U.S. Global’s Director of Research John Derrick was visiting and assessing Greek and Turkish companies such as Tsakos Energy Navigation, JUMBO, Türk Telekom and Turkcell.

 

Currency Wars – Who’s Next?

Currency war: Who will be the casualties? Sara Eisen | @saraeisen Friday, 23 Jan 2015 | 9:45 AM ET Central banks are in combat mode. On the front lines: Europe, Denmark, Canada, Switzerland, Peru and India. Each of their central banks has taken unprecedented and dramatic action to ease policy and weaken their currencies in the past few days. Central bankers may say they’re ramping up the fight against worryingly low inflation, exacerbated by the dramatic plunge in oil prices. But the immediate, and perhaps most effective, impact of the easier monetary policy moves is being felt in the foreign exchange market. “We are in currency wars,” Goldman Sachs President and COO Gary Cohn told a panel discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “The prevailing view is that the easy way to stimulate economic growth is to have a low currency.” Simon Dawson | Bloomberg | Getty Images An employee … Continue reading