Marlin Gold Mining – Analyst Coverage Initiated – BUY


Editors Note:
We have followed Marlin Gold for several years and own shares therein. There is a lot of activity going on with Marlin and it is nice to see Noble Capital Markets initiate coverage of this company.

 

Noble Capital Markets Initiates Research Coverage on Marlin Gold Mining Ltd.
On April 17, 2017 Noble Capital has issued a research report and buy recommendation on Marlin Gold Mining,
TSXV:MLN and OTCQX: MLNGF

Marlin Gold is an emerging precious metal mining company with assets in Mexico, Nicaragua and Arizona. Marlin owns 100% of two primary mines and receives payment streams and royalties from three other projects.

The buy recommendation is from C$0.70 up to a target price of C$3.00.

See Noble Capital’s Full Research Report HERE.

Gold price goes up… and then slightly down

By analyst

Source: CNBC.

By Valentina Ruiz Leotaud

After hitting a five-month high at $1,290.60 an ounce of June Comex gold, the yellow metal ended the U.S. day session modestly down at $1,286.20 an ounce.

The previous hike was driven by a lower U.S. dollar index and geopolitical tensions following White House accusations against Russia around a recent chemical attack in Syria and HR McMaster’s declarations about America’s problems with North Korea.

Source: CNBC.

However, Monday afternoon the dollar and yields picked up as did risk sentiment, following an interview with the U.S. Secretary of Treasury, Steven Mnuchin, published by The Financial Times.

Mnuchin’s expectations of a tax system reform for 2017 which, in his view, would strengthen the American currency, flipped investors’ sentiment towards the positive side and made gold slide a bit.

However, experts believe that Washington’s ongoing tensions with Pyongyang would probably support demand for the precious metal, and so the price might continue to surge this year.

May Comex silver was last down $0.104 at $18.41 an ounce.

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Source:: Infomine

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US Energy Secretary worried about coal

By analyst

By Valentina Ruiz Leotaud

In a memo issued late Friday to his chief of staff, the US Energy Secretary Rick Perry expressed concerns about the diversification of power sources and the stability of the country’s grid.

“We are blessed as a nation to have an abundance of domestic energy resources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear and hydroelectric, all of which provide affordable baseload power and contribute to a stable, reliable and resilient grid,” Perry is quoted as saying in the missive, which was initially obtained by Bloomberg. However, he adds that experts have “highlighted the diminishing diversity of our nation’s electric generation mix and what that could mean for baseload power and grid resilience.”

By “diminishing diversity,” Perry is referring to recent closures of coal-fired and nuclear power plants caused, in part, by the low cost of natural gas and a booming clean energy industry. When he talks about reliability, he points to a supposed intermittence in generation from sources such as wind and solar.

The Energy Secretary instructed his second-in-command to develop a 60-day review that looks at how regulatory burdens, subsidies, and tax policies “are responsible for forcing the premature retirement of baseload power plants.” He also wants to know whether wholesale energy markets adequately compensate actions that, in his view, strengthen grid resilience such as on-site fuel supply usually provided by coal and nuclear plants.

“Perry’s effort suggests that the [Trump] administration may be looking for other ways to keep coal plants online,” Bloomberg’s account concludes.

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Source:: Infomine

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Thousands of balls to counteract drought effects at mining sites

By analyst

Thousands of balls to counteract drought effects at mining sites

By Valentina Ruiz Leotaud

Chilean company Exma has come up with an innovative solution to counteract the effects of extreme heat and drought on tailing ponds, water desalination pools, process water pools, etc., at mining sites.

To prevent liquids from evaporating, Exma proposes the use of the Barrier Ball, a floating cover system for water bodies composed of plastic balls filled with… water.

Together, the polyethylene balls cover 91% of the surface they’re placed on. Subsequently, they create a barrier that decreases the heat and mass exchange between the liquid and the environment.

According to the company’s website, the balls can reduce evaporation by 85%, as well as diminish odor, volatile organic compounds, and corrosive vapors emissions significatively.

The National Copper Corporation of Chile claims to have seen positive results when it comes to algae control, evaporation, odor emissions, energy consumption and even wildlife protection at its Ministro Hales mine. Thus, the company has asked Exma to help them optimize water usage at its Minera Rodomiro Tomic.

The Barrier Ball, which resists temperatures of -40°C up to 80°C, is said to last for 15 years and to provide other benefits, such as a 50% reduction in energy consumption for heating liquids.

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Source:: Infomine

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Frank Holmes – Mon 17 Apr, 2017

By Big Al

The Latest from Frank Holmes

Get Ready for Inflation! Lumber Logs a 12-Year High

As if you need more proof that inflation is finally starting to pick up, lumber prices rose to a 12-year high last week, supported mainly by expectations that steep duties will soon be levied on cheap softwood imports from Canada. Lumber futures rose to nearly $415 per thousand board feet last Monday, a level unseen since March 2005, soon after homeownership peaked here in the U.S.

At issue is a mini-trade war between U.S. and Canadian loggers. For some time now, the American lumber industry has blamed its Canadian counterpart of unfairly dumping lumber in the U.S. that’s far below market value. Now, several factors are pushing timber prices higher. Chief among them are the likelihood of duties being raised at the Canadian border, possibly as early as next month; President Donald Trump’s calls to renegotiate NAFTA; and growing demand for new homes following the housing crisis as consumer optimism improves and millennial buyers finally seem eager to enter the market.

Shares of Canfor Corporation and Western Forest Products, Canada’s number two and number five lumber producers by annual output, have had a good three months, advancing 25.5 percent and 16.8 percent respectively as of April 12. Timberland-owner Weyerhaeuser has also impressed lately.

Gold Glimmers Brightly

As I told Daniela Cambone during last week’s edition of Gold Game Film, this is all very constructive for the price of gold, which has historically been used as a hedge during periods of rising inflation. The yellow metal closed above $1,270 an ounce last week for the first time since soon after the November presidential election. A “golden cross” has not yet occurred, with the 50-day moving average still below the 200-day, but such a move appears likely in the next few trading sessions if upward momentum can be sustained.

Fueled also by geopolitical tensions associated with Syria, Russia and North Korea, gold demand is on the rise, with last Tuesday’s trading volumes on gold calls surging 10 times Monday’s amount on the New York Mercantile Exchange. As I already shared with you, investor sentiment of gold during the recent European Gold Forum was particularly strong. A poll taken during the conference showed that 85 percent of attendees were bullish on the metal, with a forecast of $1,495 by year’s end.

With the U.S. ramping up military action overseas, including its dropping of a devastating bomb in Afghanistan on Thursday, many investors are lightening their risk assets in favor of “safe haven” instruments such as gold and Treasuries. The S&P 500 Index dropped below its 50-day moving average last week, signaling a slowdown in blue chip stocks.

Financials were among the biggest laggards as investors have begun to question President Trump’s ability to deregulate the banking sector. After several disappointments and setbacks, including a failure to repeal and replace Obamacare, renewed military involvement in Syria and Afghanistan might provide a welcome boost …read more

Source:: The Korelin Economics Report

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Did U.S. Cyberattack Explode North Korean Missile?

By James Rickards

This post Did U.S. Cyberattack Explode North Korean Missile? appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

[Ed. Note: Jim Rickards’ latest New York Times bestseller, The Road to Ruin: The Global Elites’ Secret Plan for the Next Financial Crisis, is out now. Learn how to get your free copy – click HERE. This vital book transcends geopolitics and rhetoric from the Fed to prepare you for what you should be watching now.]

The world was watching North Korea this weekend. Many thought it might conduct another nuclear test to coincide with its annual holiday commemorating the birth of its national founder, Kim Il Sung.

There was no nuclear test. But that doesn’t mean it was a quiet weekend.

North Korea did carry out a missile test early Sunday morning local time.

But the test was a failure, and the missile exploded shortly after liftoff.

Why did it fail?

It’s too soon to say for sure.

But former British Foreign Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind thinks the U.S. may have sabotaged the launch through a cyberattack. Rifkind told the BBC:

It could have failed because the system is not competent enough to make it work, but there is a very strong belief that the U.S. — through cyber methods — has been successful on several occasions in interrupting these sorts of tests and making them fail.

Many believe the U.S. has been interfering with North Korean missile tests since 2014, under an Obama policy referred to as “Left of Launch.” That’s probably what Rifkind was alluding to.

Interestingly, one North Korean newspaper hinted, in typical North Korean fashion, that a U.S. cyberattack may have indeed been responsible for the failure:

Yesterday, [the U.S.] dared to play a ferocious game of Special Operation targeting our ultimate dignity.

Deputy National Security Adviser K.T. McFarland was asked yesterday about Sunday’s failure but declined to comment, saying only that the test was “a fizzle.”

She did add, however, that “With any country, major country, we are entering a cyber platform, a cyber battlefield. That is where a lot of the wars of the future are going to be fought,” she continued.

That’s certainly true.

And President Trump is fully aware of the emerging importance of cyberwarfare. On the campaign trail, for example, he pledged to unleash a fresh wave of spending in the cyber sphere.

And recent events make cybersecurity even more pressing. If the U.S. is responsible for this weekend’s test failure, North Korea may try to retaliate with its own cyberattacks.

For example, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly told NBC’s Meet the Press that he’s more concerned about a North Korean cyberattack than a conventional military attack:

In the case of North Korea, you know, a kinetic threat against the United States right now, I don’t think is likely, but certainly a cyber threat.

Trump intended to issue an executive order on cybersecurity at the end of January. But it was delayed, likely for bureaucratic reasons typical of a new administration. But we can expect a rollout once all the policy people are …read more

Source:: Daily Reckoning feed

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Iron ore price in free fall

By analyst

Iron ore price in free fall

By Frik Els

The Northern China import price of 62% Fe content ore slumped again on Monday to trade down 3.7% at $64.60 per dry metric tonne according to data supplied by The Steel Index.

It’s the lowest price since November 3 last year and brings the pullback over the past month to over 30%.

Chinese GDP figures released on Monday showed an economy growing at a faster than expected pace of 6.9% on the back of a surge in fixed investment, particularly in the construction sector. While steel output growth in top consumer China has underpinned prices, the market has become fixated on additional supply growth and stockpiles at record highs.

“I think we will see the iron ore price to return to where you’d expect it to be based on the supply curve, which is around that $60 to $65 per tonne mark historically”
According to Umetal’s survey of the 42 largest ports in China, the total iron ore inventory now top 133 million tonnes, the highest ever. Elevated stocks have not dampened importer enthusiasm however with total imports for the first quarter climbing 12% to 271 million tonnes after the second highest cargo volumes recorded in March of 95.6m tonnes.

New supply worries

Noted iron ore bull, Nev Power, CEO of world number four producer Fortescue Metals Group, said last week the pullback in the price should be expected:

“I don’t think anybody should be surprised to see the iron ore price come back to more sustainable levels,” Mr Power said.

“I think we will see the iron ore price to return to where you’d expect it to be based on the supply curve, which is around that $60 to $65 per tonne mark historically,” he said.

Others are more pessimistic, FocusEconomics in its April survey of analysts and institutions shows a median forecast price of iron ore of $57 a tonne during the final quarter of this year. For Q4 2018, analysts expect prices to moderate further to average $54 over the three month period.

An April survey of analysts and institutions shows a median forecast price for iron ore of $57 a tonne during the final quarter of this year

Dutch bank ABN Amro is the most optimistic calling for a $75 average towards the end of 2017 while London-based Investec sees an average of $71.50 over the course of this year. Year to date iron ore is averaging $83.60.

BMO Capital Markets see prices correcting sharply from today’s levels to average $45 by the start of 2018 while Oxford Economics expects iron ore to average $72 this year but correct sharply to $51 in 2018.

According to estimates from Rio Tinto, world number two producer, 296m tonnes of additional seaborne supply have entered the market in the last three years.

The Melbourne-based diversified giant forecasts supply growth to slow but a combined 100m tonnes from the world’s top six producers are expected to be added to supply this year (40m tonnes) and next.

It’s not only low-cost miners from Brazil and Australia that are clouding the outlook, but domestic Chinese supply …read more

Source:: Infomine

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Hell To Pay

By MN Gordon

Somehow, this cartoon never gets old…

If you go by a partial subset of the ‘official’ government statistics, perhaps, it appears she does. The unemployment rate is at 4.5 percent, which is considered full employment. What’s more, inflation is ‘reasonably close’ to the Fed’s 2-percent inflation target. But what does this mean, really?

According to Fed Chair Yellen, it means that now’s the time to tighten up the nation’s monetary policy.

Behind the Curve

Economic nonsense comes a dime a dozen. For example, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen “think(s) we have a healthy economy now.” She even told the University of Michigan’s Ford School of Public Policy so earlier this week. Does she know what she’s talking about?

Somehow, this cartoon never gets old…

If you go by a partial subset of the ‘official’ government statistics, perhaps, it appears she does. The unemployment rate is at 4.5 percent, which is considered full employment. What’s more, inflation is ‘reasonably close’ to the Fed’s 2-percent inflation target. But what does this mean, really?

According to Fed Chair Yellen, it means that now’s the time to tighten up the nation’s monetary policy.

Behold this display of awesomeness, citizen. Doesn’t it prove that central planning “works” after all? Unfortunately the ointment is never entirely fly-free, especially when one is pondering statistical aggregates – click to enlarge.

By now you’ve likely seen this upcoming – choice – quote from Yellen. Nonetheless, we can’t resist repeating its remarkable idiocy. For Yellen, who was in the greater Detroit metropolitan area, was kind enough to humor us all with a nifty automotive analogy to explain how to go about normalizing monetary policy. Here Yellen elaborates with a variety of technical terms:

“Whereas before we had our foot pressed down on the gas pedal trying to give the economy all the oomph we possibly could, now allowing the economy to kind of coast and remain on an even keel – to give it some gas but not so much that we are pressing down hard on the accelerator – that’s a better stance of monetary policy. We want to be ahead of the curve and not behind it.”

As far as we can tell, Yellen’s merely huffing and blowing gas. What curve she wants to stay ahead of is unclear. We assume she’s referring to the inflation curve, although this does seem a bit out of context.

By our account, inflation of the money supply is, indeed, inflation. Hence, the Fed fell behind the curve between September 2008 and December 2014 when it inflated its balance sheet from $905 billion to $4.5 trillion. By our back of the napkin calculation that tallies up to nearly a 400 percent inflation of the Fed’s balance sheet. But what do we know?

The broad true US money supply TMS-2 vs. assets held by the Federal Reserve since the GFC. A few points worth noting: TMS-2 expanded by ~140% between January 2008 and January 2017. One way of looking at this statistic is “in the entire history of the US, an amount X of money was created until early 2008. Since then, the amount of money in the economy has increased by 2.4 times”. The money supply had doubled by November 2014, so it took a little less than six years to print as much money in the US than in its entire preceding history. Yes, this is quite a bit of inflation. …read more

Source:: Acting Man

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