Mining continues to drive Aus economy – ABS

The resources sector continues to underpin economic growth in Australia, as evidence by new data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), which has shown that the Australian economy grew by 0.5% in the June quarter. Chief economist for the ABS Bruce Hockman said that net exports contributed 0.6 percentage points to growth this quarter, reflecting strong exports of mining commodities.

Expect the Buyback Wave to Continue This Year

This post Expect the Buyback Wave to Continue This Year appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

A crucial theme from last year is continuing into this year — stock buybacks. Last year was a banner year for companies buying back their own shares. A month into 2019, it appears that Wall Street is set to continue that trend.

Last year, U.S. companies announced a whopping $1.1 trillion worth of buyback plans. Armed with extra cash from favorable corporate tax policy enacted in 2017, they enthusiastically bought back their own shares.

But as of mid-December, only about $800 billion of those buybacks had actually occurred. That means there could be another $300 billion of the total 2018 target still waiting to hit the market.

In fact, Wall Street is already gearing up for another banner buyback year. In a recent report, J.P. Morgan strategist Dubravko Lakos-Bujas wrote, “It’s expected that S&P 500 companies will execute some $800 billion in buybacks… in 2019.”

The Wall Street strategist also explained that the quality of 2018 buybacks were high. He revealed that companies were using their cash, rather than borrowed money, to fund buybacks. Using cash toward buybacks is expensive less than using debt.

But why did the wave of buybacks slow down late last year?

The first reason is that companies involved had already purchased stock at a very rapid rate through last September. That was one major reason we saw the market peak around that time, and in fact, hit new records.

The second was that despite trade war fears and uncertainty, companies felt confident enough to go ahead with their buybacks initially. That’s why we saw market players largely shrug off warning signs through the first three quarters of 2018.

But sentiment shifted dramatically during the last quarter of the year, culminating in essentially a bear market by late December. And more reports around the world began to point to slowing economic growth ahead.

A key factor cited for this slowdown was the impact of prolonged trade wars, which could curb real economic activity and create more uncertainty. In turn, growing volatility would keep businesses from planning expansions, or using the cash originally set aside for buybacks.

A third reason for the drop off in buybacks late last year was a record amount of public corporate and consumer debt that had to be repaid or at least serviced regularly. This overhang of debt was weighing on growth expectations. That debt load would become even more expensive if the Fed kept up with its forecasted rate hike activity in December and throughout 2019.

Some analysts even warned that the Fed might go ahead with another four rate hikes this year. That triggered fears on Wall Street that the central bank stimulus game could truly be over.

The reason for the concern is simple: The higher the interest rates, the more expensive it is to borrow and repay existing debt. For more highly leveraged corporations and emerging market countries, this would be an even greater threat. A higher dollar, resulting from more Fed tightening, could cause other currencies to depreciate against the dollar. That would make it harder to repay debt taken out in dollars.

Finally, there was heightened tension in the financial markets due to political uncertainty. With U.S. election results ensuring added battles between Congress (with Democrats taking the majority in the House of Representatives) and the White House, doubt set in over the functionality of the U.S. government going forward.

Those reservations were justified. The government shutdown that kicked off 2019 had a lot to do with shifts in the political balance in Washington.

Geopolitical tensions also rose at the end of 2018, including Brexit in the United Kingdom, street revolts in France, potential recession fears in Italy and growing unrest in South America.

All these factors combined ensured that markets were extremely volatile during the last quarter of 2018, and why it was the worst one for the markets since the Great Depression. It was not conducive to buybacks. Buybacks are supposed to raise the stock price. But strong market headwinds could have largely canceled their effects.

The prudent approach for companies facing such a negative environment was to wait out the problems until the new year.

But Jerome Powell subsequently gave into Wall Street and took a much more dovish position on both rate hikes and balance sheet reductions. That means the coast is clear again to resume the buybacks.

Back in December, some major players announced plans for 2019 buybacks. These include Boeing, which announced an $18 billion repurchase program. It also includes tech giant Facebook, which plans to buy back $9 billion of its own shares, in addition to an existing $15 billion share repurchase program started in 2017.

Also in on the buyback wave is Johnson & Johnson, which announced a $5 billion stock buyback. Others include Lowe’s and Pfizer, which both announced a $10 billion stock buyback program.

These plans are now much more likely to go forward.

Furthermore, many large corporations like Microsoft, Procter & Gamble, Home Depot and Walmart didn’t even announce buybacks in 2018.

They could well announce them for 2019. Companies that did announce big buybacks last year, like Apple, could also engage in more, adding a potential $100 billion share repurchases this year to match 2018.

Another indicator for a sizeable 2019 buyback wave is that stock prices are lower now than they were going into the fourth quarter of 2018. That means companies can buy back their shares at cheaper prices. They could buy at a discount, in other words, or at least what they hope will be a discount.

My old Wall Street firm, Goldman Sachs, has already forecast $940 billion worth of buybacks for 2019. They previously had predicted over a trillion dollars’ worth of buybacks for 2018. The number of buybacks for 2018 even exceeded their predictions.

By mid-January, of the S&P 500 companies that reported their fourth-quarter earnings, nearly 70% of them have exceeded Wall Street’s profit expectations. It’s a favorable environment for buybacks.

Yet, it may still take some time for companies to move forward with this year’s buybacks. That’s because we are still in the “black-out” period that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has created.

The period covers the time just before and after companies post earnings results. The sell-off in October coincided with the third quarter earnings season’s “blackout period.” The combination of negative environmental factors plus fewer buybacks drove markets even lower.

Now, once earnings season and the current blackout period is over, Wall Street will be unleashed to buy large blocks of stock for their major corporate clients.

If the Federal Reserve truly holds back on its former interest rate and quantitative tightening plans, as it seems likely to do, expect central bank stimulus to continue to fuel markets.

Of course, buybacks do not come without negative implications. That’s because companies are not using their cash for expansion or to pay workers more, which would generate more buying power in the overall economy. But in the short run at least, they tend to raise the stock price.

Even if Wall Street comes up against headwinds of volatility, slowing economic growth, political strife and trade wars, they can now expect the Fed and other central banks to have their backs.

Buybacks could become a very powerful force once again this year, and keep the ball rolling a while longer.

Regards,

Nomi Prins

The post Expect the Buyback Wave to Continue This Year appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

World’s “Elite” Just Sent a Chilling Warning… But There’s a Silver Lining

This post World’s “Elite” Just Sent a Chilling Warning… But There’s a Silver Lining appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

Davos Switzerland…

Davos Switzerland

It may look like a peaceful winter wonderland. But if you visit the Davos ski resort in Switzerland this week, you’ll hear some forecasts that will chill your nerves as an investor.

Fortunately, there’s a silver lining. One that will set you up for luxurious gains on your 2019 brokerage statement. But to lock in these profits, you’ll have to be brave!

Let’s jump in and see what’s happening in this snowy winter summit.

Cold Warnings from the World Economic Forum

Each year, the most influential investors, business executives and world political figures visit the tiny ski retreat of Davos in Switzerland to attend the World Economic Forum.

It’s a time when these leaders can meet face to face and discuss the state of the world economy, and how to promote the best growth possible.

I’m always intrigued by this gathering because there are so many different opinions and agendas represented. While it is interesting to hear the different perspectives that are presented throughout the week, it’s important to remember that each perspective is influenced by the person’s experiences, professional role and personal biases.

So far this week, the conference has featured a number of ominous warnings when it comes to global economic growth.

After strong “synchronized” growth in 2017, last year featured an environment where the United States grew while the rest of the world faced economic struggles. A big part of the success here in the United States came from lower taxes and a healthy business environment that created millions of new jobs.

The question this year is whether the U.S. will join the rest of the world in struggling to grow, or whether our economy will continue to buck the trend and continue to expand.

Of course, the academic “analysts” presenting at the World Economic Forum are warning of a slowdown for the United States. They’ve been singing out of the same hymnal since the bull market first began 10 years ago.

But even in their dire warnings, there is a silver lining. Because the presentations that I’ve heard so far explain that the U.S. will likely experience a “slowdown in growth” rather than a full-out recession.

The difference here is key.

A “slowdown” in growth means that our U.S. economy will still continue to grow. We will add jobs, and corporations will grow earnings. Heck, we’ll likely see workers continue to get bigger paychecks and spend money on more discretionary purchases.

That’s far from a recession — which is when the economy actually contracts, people lose their jobs, and the environment becomes much more challenging. While recessions are a part of the overall economic cycle, the U.S. economy isn’t showing signs of entering that type of environment any time soon.

So despite the warnings of slower growth coming from Davos, the underlying data still points to a healthy U.S. economy. And that’s great news considering the picture for the rest of the world.

There’s Only One Place to Invest…

One of the most encouraging discussions I’ve been listening in on is the question of whether to invest in the United States or the rest of the world.

Even with the sharp pullback in the fourth quarter, the U.S. has been the best place for investors to put their capital. After all, our economy continues to grow and corporations are reporting record earnings!

Looking to the year ahead, there’s no reason to believe this year will be any different.

After all, China’s economic growth has been slowing dramatically. And yet stock prices for many Chinese companies still reflect optimism that the country will get back to the growth levels from a decade ago. That’s simply not going to happen.

Looking at European investments, the Brexit discussion has left European markets in a place of extreme uncertainty. And many European banks have financial risks that are becoming much more worrisome.

Elsewhere, the low price of crude oil has put governments and economies in energy-dependent countries into an uncomfortable place. And investors in those countries are looking for safer places to put their capital.

That leaves the United States as one of the few healthy places to invest. And thanks to the fourth quarter pullback, U.S. stocks are actually cheap compared to the earnings that these companies are generating.

That’s why here at The Daily Edge, we’re confident investing in thriving U.S. companies with growing earnings. We’ve had some volatility as stock markets have fluctuated. But investing in the best American opportunities has allowed us to weather the storms in late 2018, and should set us up very well for a profitable 2019.

So don’t listen too closely to the warnings from Davos. Instead, keep your capital invested in the safest economy for the year ahead.

Here’s to growing and protecting your wealth!

Zach Scheidt

Zach Scheidt
Editor, The Daily Edge
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