Secrets of the Vegas Insider Who Mentored Warren Buffett and Bill Gross

By Andy Snyder Editor’s Note: A version of this piece originally ran in Andy Snyder’s free e-letter, Manward Digest. You can go here to automatically subscribe if you haven’t already.

It’s one of the most common questions we get. Readers often write us and ask how much money they should devote to each trade.

Below is the Vegas secret that I share with my Manward Digest readers.

To be clear, we have a moral issue with gambling. After all, one of our core beliefs is that wealth leads to Liberty. Therefore gambling leads to slavery.

It’s a dangerous game.

We don’t partake.

Even so, we’re fascinated by the numbers behind it all. They’ve certainly guided our investment philosophy.

One man – an infamous Vegas insider – has taught us a lot.

Edward Thorp is the math genius and professional gambler who turned the odds on Vegas and then revolutionized Wall Street.

He’s a Manward kind of man – a thinker.

Even though he spent years in the blackjack game, Thorp would argue he’s not a gambler. He’s an investor. He put down his chips only when the odds of winning were better than the odds of losing.

Thorp won a lot.

He won so much, he was kicked out of most casinos.

When Thorp put on disguises and taught others to do his work for him, Vegas changed the rules. Then, with the math no longer in his favor, he took his skills to Wall Street.

It was a move that benefited us all… especially when it comes to managing our risk.
Revealing a Secret
You see, there’s a secret of the Vegas blackjack tables that aptly applies to investing.

Thorp used it to know exactly how much to bet on each hand so he’d be sure to end up a winner.

But it worked equally well on Wall Street as a tool to determine how much to invest in each position. It made Thorp a near billionaire – worth some $800 million today.

He taught it to Bill Gross (who Thorp mentored) and Warren Buffett. From what we hear, it treated them well, too.

All three still use this vital risk-management strategy.

It’s a formula called the Kelly criterion, and it spits out the percentage of your portfolio that you should devote to one trade.

It looks like this: Kelly % = W – [(1 – W) / R].

We need just two important pieces of data to crunch the numbers.

First, we need our win probability – the “W” in the equation above. That’s the historic proportion of trades we’ve made that have led to a gain.

It’s simple to calculate.

First, we gather the results of at least our last 25 to 50 trades – not the dollars made or the percentages lost, just whether they were gains or losses.

Simply divide the number of positive trades by the total number of trades.

For example, if 35 out of 50 trades were wins, our “W” number would be 0.7.

From there… we need the “R.” That’s our win-loss ratio.

To get it, simply divide the average dollars gained on each winning trade by the average loss on each …read more

Source:: Investment You

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5 Critical Takeaways From Buffett In Omaha (You’ll Be Disturbed By #4…)

Warren Buffett in stadium

By Jody Chudley

This post 5 Critical Takeaways From Buffett In Omaha (You’ll Be Disturbed By #4…) appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

The first Saturday in May it happens.

Forty-thousand or so people book a hotel room, pack their bags, jump on a plane and come to the vacation hot-spot that is Omaha, Nebraska.

I know, it sounds crazy doesn’t it? Nobody vacations in Omaha…

The reason that they all do this is even more bizarre.

All of these people do it to sit quietly and listen to a 93 year old and an 86 year old share their thoughts and opinions!

I think it is safe to say that there is nothing else like this on our fine planet.

These two very senior citizens are not your average retirement home residents.

They are Warren Buffett and his longtime partner in crime Charlie Munger.

Together they have turned Berkshire Hathaway from being a near worthless textile mill in the late 1960s into a conglomerate with a $410 billion market cap today.1

The event that brings so many people to Omaha is Berkshire’s annual shareholder meeting. In addition to the 40,000 in attendance there are more watching the livestream on the internet.

It is the wisdom that these men share at the meeting each year that brings all these people together. It is the wisdom of these two men that make all these people do something very unusual.

They all just sit there and listen.

Here are the key things that 40,000 plus listeners learned this year.

Need to Know #1 – $9.5 Billion Reasons Buffett Should Love President Trump

As he has gotten older Buffett has gotten somewhat more political. He was a very vocal supporter for President Obama in both of his victories and this time around he was publicly in the corner of Hillary Clinton.

While Buffett bet on the wrong horse in the election, I would have a hard time saying that he didn’t win.

And win big at that.

President Trump’s plan to reduce the corporate tax rate to 15 percent will be a huge benefit for Berkshire Hathaway and Buffett personally. Thanks to Buffett’s incredible long term investments in companies like Coca-Cola, American Express and Wells Fargo, Berkshire sits on over $95 billion in unrealized capital gains.2

According to Buffett, if the corporate tax rate were to drop by 10 percent Berkshire’s value would immediately increase by $9.5 billion thanks to the reduced future tax owing on all of those unrealized gains.

Even for Berkshire that is a huge amount of money.

On top of that will be another multi-billion bump in cash flows that come with a reduced annual tax burden.

Not a bad consolation prize for when your candidate doesn’t win!

Need to Know #2 – Self-Driving Vehicles Will Permanently Damage These Businesses

Investing is all about predicting the future. The better that you are figuring out what is going to happen the better you will be as an investor.

Buffett has excelled because he has focused on companies with giant competitive moats around them. Powerful brand names like Coca-Cola which generate much more predictable …read more

Source:: Daily Reckoning feed

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These were the top producing diamond mines in 2016

By analyst

These were the top producing diamond mines in 2016

By Cecilia Jamasmie

While diamond industry experts warn that demand is expected to outstrip supply as early as 2019, the largest mines keep producing the coveted rocks at full steam.

Here are last year’s top 10 diamond mines in terms of output and value, based on data compiled by expert Paul Zimnisky.

(Image courtesy of De Beers Group.)

1. Jwaneng, Botswana

Produced 11,975,000 carats, worth $2,347 million

Jwaneng, the richest diamond mine in the world, is located in south-central Botswana in the Naledi river valley of the Kalahari. It’s 2 kilometres across at its widest point and patrolled by colossal 300-tonne trucks that labour up the terraced slopes.

Nicknamed “the Prince of Mines”, Jwaneng was opened in 1982, as the diamond trade helped Botswana go from being one of the world’s poorest countries to one of Africa’s wealthiest.

Sunrise at Yubileyny open-pit. (Image by Ruslan Akhmetsaphin | ALROSA.)

2. Jubilee, Russia

Produced 9,231,000 carats, worth $1,431 million

Belonging to ALROSA, the world’s top diamond miner by output in carats, the Jubilee mine (also known as Yubileinaya), has been in production since 1989. It’s among the world’s biggest diamond mines by area.

Image courtesy of Diamond Producers Association

3. International, Russia

Produced 3,948,000 carats, worth $829 million

Also known as Internatsionalny, this underground mine has been in operations since 1999. ALROSA estimates the deposit will run out of diamonds by 2022.

Image courtesy of Diamond Producers Association

4. Orapa, Botswana

Produced 7,931,000 carats, worth $753 million

The Orapa mine is the ninth largest diamond mine in the world by reserve and the world’s largest mine by area. It has been in production since 1971. It’s owned by Debswana, a joint venture of De Beers and the Botswana Government.

Currently Orapa is mining at a depth of 250 metres and is expected to reach 450 metres by 2026.

Aerial view of Debmarine’s Debmar Atlantic vessel, which mines diamonds off the coast of Namibia. (Image courtesy of Diamond Producers Association)

5. Debmarine, Namibia

Produced 1,169,000 carats, worth $585 million

De Beers’ Debmarine uses a fleet of five specialized marine mining vessels to screen material recovered from the ocean floor.

These deposits are then airlifted by helicopter for further processing on shore. It’s Namibia’s largest diamond producer, accounting for 70% of the country’s output of these stones.

(Image courtesy of Wenco)

6. Catoca, Angola

Produced 6,700,000 carats*, worth $570 million

This diamond mine is the world’s fourth largest. It’s owned by a consortium of international mining interests, with Endiama (the state mining company of Angola) having a majority stake.

* = Figure not officially confirmed

(Image courtesy of ALROSA)

7. Nyurbinskaya, Russia

Produced 5,001,000 carats, worth $565 million

The Nyurba Mining and Processing Division (MPD) is one of the youngest enterprises of ALROSA. It operates at the Nakyn ore field, which includes the Nyurbinskya and Botuobinsky open-pits, and two same-name alluvial placers.

The impressive Diavik. (Image: Rio Tinto.)

8. Diavik, Canada

Produced 6,658,000 carats, worth $539 …read more

Source:: Infomine

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Silver Elevator Keeps Going Down – Precious Metals Supply and Demand

By Keith Weiner

Frexit Threat Macronized

The dollar moved strongly, and is now over 25mg gold and 1.9g silver. This was a holiday-shortened week, due to the Early May bank holiday in the UK.

The lateral entrant wakes up, preparing to march on, avenge the disinherited and let loose with fresh rounds of heavy philosophizing… we can’t wait! [PT]

The big news as we write this, Macron beat Le Pen in the French election. We suppose this means markets can continue to do what they wanted to do before the threat of Frexit, shutting off trade between France and the rest of Europe, and who knows what else Le Pen was plotting to do to the French people.

This will be a short Report this week, as Keith has been working hard on a paper to address the question of which metal will have the higher interest rate. Look for that tomorrow.

Fundamental Developments

Below as the only true look at the supply and demand fundamental of the metals, but first, the price and ratio charts.

Prices of gold and silver – click to enlarge.

Next, this is a graph of the gold price measured in silver, otherwise known as the gold to silver ratio. It had another major move up this week, after a major move up last week and one the week before.

It now sits at the same level it was a year ago. If it breaks above 76, then the next resistance looks to be 80.

Gold-silver ratio – click to enlarge.

For each metal, we will look at a graph of the basis and co-basis overlaid with the price of the dollar in terms of the respective metal. It will make it easier to provide brief commentary. The dollar will be represented in green, the basis in blue and co-basis in red.

Here is the gold graph.

Gold basis and co-basis and the dollar price – click to enlarge.

If we didn’t know better, we would say that as fast as the co-basis (i.e. scarcity, the red line) ran up, the price of the dollar (which is the inverse of the conventional view of the price of gold) ran up faster.

Actually, that is accurate. And consequently, our calculated fundamental price of gold fell over twenty bucks (though it’s still more than twenty bucks over the market price).

Now let’s look at silver.

Silver basis and co-basis and the dollar price – click to enlarge.

In silver, the same phenomenon occurred though to an exaggerated degree.

Last week and the week before, we asked:

Some speculators definitely got flushed. However, the question is how many and how much?

Then we said:

Clearly it happened to more of them this week. And, unless the fundamentals get stronger, it is likely to flush even more leveraged futures positions. Our calculated fundamental price fell three cents this week, now a buck thirty under the market.

It happened to …read more

Source:: Acting Man

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Renamed Joy Global officially launched as Komatsu Mining Corp

By analyst

By Andrew Topf

Executives, elected officials and hundreds of Milwaukee-area employees today celebrated the official launch of Komatsu Mining Corp., a global mining equipment and services company operating as a subsidiary of Komatsu Ltd., based in Japan.

Komatsu America Corp., a subsidiary of Komatsu Ltd. completed its $3.7 billion acquisition of Milwaukee-based Joy Global Inc. on April 5, and at that time announced its intention to rename the 133-year-old company Komatsu Mining Corp.

“These kinds of mergers always produce some anxiety and concern going forward, but we didn’t buy this company to close it up. Quite the contrary. There’s huge experience here, more than 100 years worth. We want to capitalize on that and make it grow”: Komatsu Mining CEO Jeffrey Dawes

Before acquiring Joy Global, whose shares have been delisted from the New York Stock Exchange, Komatsu only made surface-mining equipment, while Joy was the largest independent manufacturer of machines used underground.

The deal was Komatsu’s biggest-ever acquisition since it was formed in 1921. The two combined companies have some 60,000 employees worldwide.

Jeffrey Dawes, the new chief executive of Komatsu Mining Corp., told the assembled guests that Komatsu has no plans to close the Joy Global plant in Milwaukee, which has nearly 1,000 employees. In 2016 Joy Global laid off 130 employees at the same location as today’s ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett.

“These kinds of mergers always produce some anxiety and concern going forward, but we didn’t buy this company to close it up,” Dawes told reporters at a news conference. “Quite the contrary. There’s huge experience here, more than 100 years worth. We want to capitalize on that and make it grow.”

The merged company said it will continue to promote and invest in the Joy, P&H and Montabert brands.

“The P&H, Joy and Montabert products align perfectly with existing Komatsu offerings, allowing us to provide customers with a full set of solutions,” said Komatsu President and CEO Tetsuji Ohashi. “But it is the people behind the product lines that will truly make our integration a success. We are very excited to welcome more than 10,000 employees with deep knowledge and understanding of the mining industry, and a commitment to service and safety. This brings great opportunity for us to expand upon the direct service approach and, together, bring products to market faster, fully appreciated by customers.”

The post Renamed Joy Global officially launched as Komatsu Mining Corp appeared first on MINING.com.

…read more

Source:: Infomine

The post Renamed Joy Global officially launched as Komatsu Mining Corp appeared first on Junior Mining Analyst.

La Défense de l’Enlightenment

By Brian Maher

This post La Défense de l’Enlightenment appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

“Of course Marine Le Pen is going to win, and thank God… France needs Marine Le Pen… like America needed Trump to put some order in the White House and the country.”

Yeah. Well.

We did something Friday we’ve never done before…

We offered readers a free trade… compliments of the house… no subscription required on any of our fancy trading services.

If Marine Le Pen won yesterday’s election in France, the trade could have potentially paid up to 900% — in just a couple of weeks.

Pretty handsome.

Our reasoning: Le Pen was such a dark horse, such a bare possibility… that any intrepid soul willing to try his luck on her should reap a windfall.

But a ghost got into our machinery Friday afternoon.

And we couldn’t push the issue out in time for readers to book the trade.

Just as well, really.

The delay spared the reader who authored the above prediction any temptation to put his money where his mouth was.

Or anyone else whose competitive spirits we may have tickled.

Of course, Madame Le Pen took a trouncing yesterday.

Her opponent, centrist “independent” Emmanuel Macron, ran away with it, 66%-34%.

And the trade is down nearly 90% since Friday.

There’s still a chance it’ll rebound to near breakeven by May 19, when the option expires.

But no 900% gain. Which is something of a relief to our troubled conscience. Imagine coming on today trying to explain how our tardiness cost you a shot at 900%?

(Would you have made that trade Friday afternoon had you received the issue in time? Let us know. And be honest! dr@dailyreckoning.com.)

Jim Rickards defied consensus by predicting both of last year’s shockers — June’s Brexit and November’s election of Donald Trump.

But Jim doesn’t shock for the sake of shocking. And this time he found himself swimming in the mainstream, paddling right alongside Mr. Establishment:

“Let me be perfectly clear,” Jim came out flat-footed in Friday’s reckoning. “I fully expect Macron to win this Sunday. I think the polls have it right this time.”

No hems. No haws. No ifs, ands or buts.

How was today’s market reaction to Macron’s win?

In a word… subdued.

The Dow was up a slender five points. The S&P couldn’t even scratch out one full point today. The Nasdaq couldn’t manage two.

Macron’s win was already “baked in the cake,” as the saying has it.

Any surprise would have been on the downside.

And VIX — Wall Street’s “fear gauge” — relaxed to its lowest level today since February 2007.

Over 10 years ago.

On the other hand, the euro notched a six-month high against the dollar today — $1.093.

No surprise there.

Perhaps more surprising is gold. The “safety trade” coughed up just 70 cents today. We suspected worse.

Now the larger question…

Is the great populist tide that swept Britain out of the European Union and Donald Trump into the White House… receding?

The Netherlands rejected a nationalist candidate in March. Now France has done the same.

Bloomberg bleats (or gloats?) that “Macron’s decisive triumph over the anti-euro Marine Le Pen …read more

Source:: Daily Reckoning feed

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Warning Lights Flashing as GM and Ford Slump

auto-industry-subprime-loans-1

By Samuel Taube

Almost every investor knows the story of the Detroit auto industry collapse in the late 2000s.

The Great Recession couldn’t have come at a worse time for General Motors (NYSE: GM), Ford (NYSE: F) or Chrysler (NYSE: FCAU). As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan raged, oil and gas prices rushed upward. That decimated sales of Detroit’s flagship products: giant trucks and SUVs.

Given that the auto industry suffered in a time of high oil prices, you’d think that it would be doing great with today’s rock-bottom prices.

You’d be wrong.

Ford and GM shares plunged Tuesday after both automakers reported extremely disappointing April sales. Revenue growth has been slowing in the industry for three consecutive months now. And auto inventories are at their highest levels since the Great Recession.

What caused this new auto industry crisis, and how bad could it get? As we’ll see below, the problems that led automakers to this point are very different from the ones that led to the 2009 bailout.
The Industry’s Own Little Subprime Loan Bubble
In the late 2000s, Detroit nearly destroyed itself by focusing on gas guzzlers in a climate of rising oil prices. But the problems with today’s auto industry aren’t really related to vehicle design, nor gas prices.

In fact, the recent collapse in auto sales bears much more of a resemblance to the late 2000s housing crash.

Don’t panic – it’s not going to destroy the global economy. The auto industry is considerably smaller than the real estate sector. And the market for auto loans is a fraction of the size of the mortgage market. But size aside, the causes of these two downturns are remarkably similar.

In recent years, aggressive sales incentives and predatory subprime lending practices have created unsustainable sales expectations in the auto industry. Manufacturers, dealers and financiers have all played a part in flooding the market with cars… And now they can’t find enough buyers. Just replace “cars” with “houses,” and you’ve got 2007 through 2008 in a nutshell.

Part of this overselling phenomenon involves dealerships offering insane bargains to credit-worthy buyers. In this time of near-zero interest rates, car sellers can’t make much money from loans to buyers with good credit scores.

Instead, they’ve been trying to make up that money with sales volume. And they’ve been offering consumers zero-interest loans and deep discounts in an overzealous bid to move units.

The low interest rates have also incentivized dealers and financiers to double down on subprime loans, which can carry APRs north of 20%. The popular HBO show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver ran a segment about the subprime auto loan boom last summer.

As Oliver explained, these subprime loans rarely end well for the borrower or the lender. Borrowers have been defaulting on their loans at an increasing rate. And when that happens, their cars get repossessed and end up back on a used car lot, thus raising inventories.

Between the predatory lending practices and the unsustainable sales incentives, it’s no wonder that the industry can’t find enough new car buyers to sustain its pace.

[iu-adbox]
The …read more

Source:: Investment You

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The E.U. Is Not Going Away

By James Rickards

This post The E.U. Is Not Going Away appeared first on Daily Reckoning.

[Ed. Note: Jim Rickards’ latest New York Times bestseller, The Road to Ruin: The Global Elites’ Secret Plan for the Next Financial Crisis, is out now. Learn how to get your free copy – click HERE. This vital book transcends geopolitics and rhetoric from the Fed to prepare you for what you should be watching now.]

Yesterday’s runaway victory of France’s pro-E.U. candidate, Emmanuel Macron, should put an end to talk about the end of the E.U.

I defied expert consensus twice last year by predicting Brexit and the election of Donald Trump. I was widely ridiculed on both occasions, but I was proven right.

But I don’t make predictions to grab attention or make headlines. They’re based on the actual evidence I see. And I also predicted that Macron would win yesterday, which was also the consensus view.

His opponent, Marine Le Pen of the National Front party, won 34% of the vote, to Macron’s 66%. It should be noted though, that the last time the National Front party made the final round of the election, it only received 20% of the vote.

So yesterday’s loss, while decisive, nonetheless represents a dramatic gain for the National Front party. And the populist, nationalist, anti-immigration story is not going away.

But the Euro as a currency is much more stable than people realize. Not only did many believe Brexit meant the demise of the European Union. They also believed it spelled the end of the Euro as a currency.

I was not among them.

Brexit was not about leaving the Euro, for example — it was never on the Euro in the first place. Britain remained on the Pound. It was about leaving the E.U.

But beyond the Euro, there’s something more fundamental you need to understand about the E.U.

The European Union is not primarily an economic project. It’s primarily a political project.

Does it have a lot of economic problems? Absolutely, from Greece to Portugal, Italian banks, et cetera. But its primary purpose is political.

Much has been made of Brexit. But the U.K. was never really a good fit with the E.U. to begin with. Besides being geographically separated from continental Europe, Britain is also culturally distinct. Further, it has a different legal system.

Many of the countries on the continent have what’s called a code-based system of law. In a code system, problems are addressed by writing rules. There’s practically a rule for everything, including how much wine a bartender can pour into a glass, for example. If a rule doesn’t adequately address a problem, they’ll write another rule. If that doesn’t solve it, they’ll write another and so on.

Contrast that with the U.K., which has a tradition of common law. Common law is different than code-based law. Yes, there are laws, rules and regulations in common law. Probably far too many. But judges have greater discretion under common law that lets them look past the actual letter of the law to achieve equitable …read more

Source:: Daily Reckoning feed

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Daily Market Wrap – Mon 8 May, 2017

By Cory The VIX closing in to a 30+ year low

A boring day for the markets but the VIX did put in a 7% down move. Complacency continues to dominate. I also look at the daily chart for the USD which remains in a downtrend and does not show a lot of potential to break this downtrend. As for the precious metals… at least we didn’t see the stocks sell off. Already a better start than last week.

Download audio file (2017_05_08-Market-Wrap.mp3)

Click here for the most recent COT report presented by Scotiabank.

…read more

Source:: The Korelin Economics Report

The post Daily Market Wrap – Mon 8 May, 2017 appeared first on Junior Mining Analyst.

European Manufacturers on a Tear on Weaker Euro

manufacturing in major economies continues to expand
click to enlarge

Both the U.S. and China continued to expand at the start of the second quarter, though at a slightly slower pace than in March. U.S. manufacturing growth relaxed a little more than 2 percent, from 57.2 to 54.8, but it still remains at a high level in the six months following the presidential election. Chinese factories pumped the brakes in April, with growth slowing to a seven-month low.

Manufacturing on a global level continued to expand as well but, like the U.S. and China, at a slower pace. The index fell from 53 in March to 52.8 in April, with the one-month reading falling below its three-month moving average for the first time since April of last year.

Like clockwork, copper and oil were off last week. As I’ve

At the start of the second quarter, the eurozone’s manufacturing sector grew at its fastest pace in six years, climbing from 56.2 in March to 56.7 in April and marking the eighth straight month of expansion. Of the eight eurozone countries that IHS Markit surveys, only Greece failed to show any improvement during the month.

Growth was spurred by new orders, output and job creation, and companies are benefiting from both the historically weak euro and the European Central Bank’s ongoing stimulus, including low interest rates. Factory jobs are currently seeing one of their strongest upticks in the survey’s 20-year history.

Ahead of France’s presidential election this past weekend—polls heavily favored the victor, 39-year-old Emmanuel Macron, over far-right candidate Marine Le Pen—the country showed impressive momentum, rising from 53.3 in March to 55.1 in April. New orders grew at their sharpest pace in six years. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom’s manufacturing sector continued to expand post-Brexit, rising to a three-year high of 57.3.

click to enlarge

Both the U.S. and China continued to expand at the start of the second quarter, though at a slightly slower pace than in March. U.S. manufacturing growth relaxed a little more than 2 percent, from 57.2 to 54.8, but it still remains at a high level in the six months following the presidential election. Chinese factories pumped the brakes in April, with growth slowing to a seven-month low.

Manufacturing on a global level continued to expand as well but, like the U.S. and China, at a slower pace. The index fell from 53 in March to 52.8 in April, with the one-month reading falling below its three-month moving average for the first time since April of last year.

click to enlarge

Like clockwork, copper and oil were off last week. As I’ve shown a number of times before, the PMI can be used as a forecast tool for commodities and natural resource prices.

Last Wednesday copper lost 3.5 percent, marking the largest single-day loss since September 2015. The red metal ended the week at $2.53 a pound. Oil tumbled nearly 5 percent on Thursday to close the trading day at $45.48, a level we haven’t seen since December. On Friday it finished above $46 a barrel.

SALT Conference

Later this month I’ll be in Las Vegas attending the annual SkyBridge Alternatives Conference (SALT), which normally attracts some of the biggest rock stars in the hedge fund and investing world. This year’s speaker lineup includes Ben Bernanke; Jeffrey Gundlach, CEO of DoubleLine; Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Alphabet; Bill Ackman, CEO of Pershing Square Capital; and many more. It should be a highly enlightening conference, and I’ll likely have a few takeaways to share with you.

Subscribe today to Frank Talk, my award-winning CEO blog!

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. …read more

Source:: Frank Talk

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